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How to answer TELL ME ABOUT YOURSELF interview question
 
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Learn how to prepare for the job interview question "tell me about yourself" with these top tips. The TELL ME ABOUT YOURSELF question is often the first to be asked at an interview and you need to get the answer right in order to give a good impression right from the start. We've got some general tips and if English is not your first language then we have some advice as to how to answer to make the most of your English level (even if it's not fantastic). Your host is Gideon CEO of LetThemTalk in Paris and formerly an IT consultant in London. Intermediate and advanced English lessons with subtitles on our youtube channel. Brought to you by LetThemTalk language school in Paris. We go deeper Subscribe here http://www.youtube.com/user/letthemtalkparis?sub_confirmation=1
Views: 1694834 LetThemTalkTV
HOW TO PASS A JOB INTERVIEW: The top 10 tips
 
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Learn how to prepare for your job interview with these top tips. This video covers some general points about the best to approach to successfully passing an interview. We also have some additional tips if English is not your first language. The tips fall into several categories including introductions, body language, what to say and what not to say at the interview. If you are unsure about your English we have some expressions and phrases to help you make the most of your skills. Your host is Gideon CEO of LetThemTalk in Paris and formerly an IT consultant in London. If you like this video then watch the next in the series "How to answer the interview question: TELL ME ABOUT YOURSELF" https://youtu.be/ge9QOO_F8Tg Intermediate and advanced English lessons with subtitles on our youtube channel. Brought to you by LetThemTalk language school in Paris. We go deeper Subscribe here http://www.youtube.com/user/letthemtalkparis?sub_confirmation=1
Views: 1279236 LetThemTalkTV
"Like to do" or "Like doing"? 3 differences explained: English grammar
 
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I like reading or I like to read? I like to wear slippers at home. I like having a moustache. In this video we'll look at 3 situations when you have to use like + infinitive or the gerund (verb + ing). We'll also look at when you can use both without any change in meaning.
Views: 29867 LetThemTalkTV
NOT SORRY: Expressions in English and When you shouldn't apologize
 
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Write and Speak English with more confidence and more authority. In this video you'll learn when to use "sorry" and when to use "I'm afraid " Subscribe to LetThemTalkTV for more great learning English videos http://www.youtube.com/user/letthemtalkparis?sub_confirmation=1
Views: 12448 LetThemTalkTV
PRESENT PERFECT or PAST SIMPLE: How to use them correctly The BEST EXPLANATION
 
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Do you have difficulty deciding when to use the present perfect and when to use the past simple? If so this video is for you. Here we explain the difference simply and clearly with examples of usage. The grammar is explained (with English subtitles) by Gideon a British teacher with 20 years' experience. We go deeper If you like our videos subscribe here for more. http://www.youtube.com/user/letthemtalkparis?sub_confirmation=1
Views: 20956 LetThemTalkTV
GET is difficult BUT NOT IN THE WAY YOU THINK (English grammar)
 
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Learn the many meanings of GET in English. Here we explain how to use GET. It's not so complicated but there is one situation where it's difficult and that is in written English. Intermediate and advanced English lessons with subtitles on our youtube channel. Brought to you by LetThemTalk language school in Paris. We go deeper Subscribe here http://www.youtube.com/user/letthemtalkparis?sub_confirmation=1
Views: 47591 LetThemTalkTV
What's the difference between travel, journey, trip and voyage?
 
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Are you confused about when to use the words travel, journey trip and voyage? In this video you'll find out with examples of usage. For more English language learning videos subscribe to LetThemTalkTV http://www.youtube.com/user/letthemtalkparis?sub_confirmation=1 Find out more about LetThemTalk at our website http://www.letthemtalk.fr.
Views: 15184 LetThemTalkTV
Speak FLUENT (British) English today with these KEY Conversational Phrases.
 
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Here are some key expressions and phrases to help you speak fluent British English. Sometimes it's the small reflex words in conversation that are the most difficult. Anyone who has learnt a language will tell you that. Here we give expressions for: Introductions, agreement, surprise, thanking, leaving and general small talk. This video is for all levels of English with some basic terms as well as some more advanced phrases, some formal expressions and some slang. Intermediate and advanced English lessons with subtitles on our youtube channel. Brought to you by LetThemTalk language school in Paris. We go deeper Subscribe here http://www.youtube.com/user/letthemtalkparis?sub_confirmation=1
Views: 78200 LetThemTalkTV
Speak English like a native use won't & wouldn't for refusals
 
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This grammar will help you speak more like a native English speaker does. Here we explain how to use "won't" and "wouldn't" for indicating an unsuccessful attempt and a refusal. Subscribe to LetThemTalkTV for more great learning English videos http://www.youtube.com/user/letthemtalkparis?sub_confirmation=1 Transcript: Hello and welcome to LetThemTalk . If you are learning English you know that the modal verb "will" can be used to express the future but this is not the only way we use it. In English we use "will" in many different ways including in the present. Today we're going to look at "will not" or "won't" to talk about refusals.  In English when we want to say that something is not working after attempting to make it work we use "will not" or "won't". This man is having a lot of trouble with his car. What would you say? That's right.  "The car won't start".  Now, If are are thinking that you should say "the car doesn't start" well that's not quite correct because he's making an attempt and it doesn't respond so you use "won't". His car won't start. and just to remind you we are not talking about the future here we are using will to talk about a present situation  Look at some more examples the computer won't work.  the window won't open. We also use this form to talk about people refusing to do something He won't eat his vegetables  the soldiers won't fight.  I won't go there Remember you must use "will not" or "won't" here if you use "don't" or "doesn't" it can change the meaning For example, "the workers won't work today" - means they refuse to work, they are on strike "the workers don't work today" - means they are not working because it might be a holiday.  In the past we use use "wouldn't". I remind you that wouldn't here is not a conditional it's just expressing the same refusals that we i just talked about but in the past.  I was late to work today because the car wouldn't start.  I phoned all day but she wouldn't answer the phone... Even though I was telling the truth he wouldn't believe me That's it thanks for watching more English language videos coming soon.
Views: 16450 LetThemTalkTV
When to use IF and when to use WHETHER  | Two Minute Grammar
 
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Do you get confused with when to use IF and WHETHER in English. If you do you everything will be explained here and in just two minutes! This is another episode in our 2 minute grammar series. Intermediate and advanced English lessons with subtitles on our youtube channel. Brought to you by LetThemTalk language school in Paris (and sometimes London) We go deeper Subscribe here http://www.youtube.com/user/letthemtalkparis?sub_confirmation=1
Views: 17407 LetThemTalkTV
60 Incredibly Useful Phrases for Fluent English Conversation (Binomials)
 
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Here we have 60 binomial pairs (and trinomial pairs) which are useful phrases that you can use in everyday conversation to increase your fluency. Native English speakers use them all the time and if you want to reach an advanced level you should start using them too. Binomial pairs are just as common is English as phrasal verbs so do learn them Credits to this video Definitions from Macmillan Dictionary Merriam-Webster Dictionary Collins Dictionary Oxford English Dictionary Oxford Learner's Dictionary Dictionary.com Intermediate and advanced English lessons with subtitles on our youtube channel. Brought to you by LetThemTalk language school in Paris (and sometimes London). We go deeper Subscribe here http://www.youtube.com/user/letthemtalkparis?sub_confirmation=1 Learn English in Paris and online www.letthemtalk.fr
Views: 417118 LetThemTalkTV
10 ESSENTIAL English Expressions
 
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Today we've got 10 useful English expressions and idioms that you can use every day. If you're learning English you need to learn some expressions and idioms. But don't try and learn every expression there is. Even native speakers don't know them all of course not. Instead build up a toolbox of useful phrases. Divide them into categories and take one out at the right moment. these are my personal favourites or at least ones I use all the time. All of them are useful and are suitable in a number of situations. Where I know the history of the expression I'll explain that too. Intermediate and advanced English lessons with subtitles on our youtube channel. Brought to you by LetThemTalk language school in Paris. We go deeper Subscribe here http://www.youtube.com/user/letthemtalkparis?sub_confirmation=1
Views: 51970 LetThemTalkTV
What is the dfference between will and shall?
 
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In the video you will learn the difference between will and shall, for the future and for making suggestions. Subscribe to LetThemTalkTV for more great learning English videos http://www.youtube.com/user/letthemtalkparis?sub_confirmation=1 Transcript: What's the difference between shall and will ? Hello and welcome to LetThemTalk today we're going to explain how to use the modal verb shall and talk about the difference between will and shall. Let's have a look. The first use of shall is for expressing the future and is similar to will. Look at these two sentences and tell me which you think is correct. When I have enough money I will buy a new car. When I have enough money I shall buy a new car. Well, actually both are correct But. although shall is less often used than will, the traditional rules say that you use shall with the first person I  and we, and will with you, he, she, it and they. This is because originally, shall was used with the meaning of obligation, and will with the meaning of desire or intention. But these days most people will use will and not shall as in I will be there tomorrow especially when speaking and that's perfectly correct or, if you contract the sentence I'll be there tomorrow, we don't know if shall or will is being used, and, again it's correct. There is one advanced point, and, this is only for the traditional rules, if you want to say that something must definitely happen then the rules of shall I mentioned before are switched. So will is used with the first person I and we and shall is used for you, he, she it and they. This use is rare and usually limited to formal situations and legal documents to talk about obligation for example. The Authority shall be responsible for the safety of the equipment. And also to talk about giving commands such as the commandment in the bible you shall not kill. The negative of will is will not or won't when it is contracted. The negative of shall is shall not or shan't when it's is contracted. Although in American English shan't is not used. Let me just repeat what I said earlier, when talking about the future it's perfectly ok to use will instead of shall but it's good to know the rule in case you hear somebody or read something using shall because it is still used sometimes in conversation as well as in formal written English. You might get the impression that the use of shall is dying out but there is still one case where shall is still used and that is for making offers, and suggestions. We use it with I and we in questions. Here you cannot substitute will for shall. Let's look at some examples. For making offers to somebody make a question starting with « shall I «Here are some examples. You must be thirsty shall I get you a drink. You're busy shall I call back tomorrow. Shall I play you a song? Shall I open the window If you want to make a suggestion which includes yourself and another person or other people use « shall we » for example. Shall we go ? Shall we speak English shall we chose a different hotel ? Shall we take the train ? An important point to remember is that we respond to a suggestion with a shall we question with let's. For example shall we go. The response will be « yes, let's. » Shall we buy a new car « yes, let's The negative is no let's not. Shall we stay here « no, let's not » Shall we stay at this hotel ? Shall we eat here ? You can also this shall form to ask for advice or confirmation often with a question word word such as what, when, who or how. Here are some examples What shall I get Jill for her birthday ? Whom shall I call ? When shall we arrive Remember you must use shall here if you use will it completely changes the meaning. In the last example : When shall we arrive ? means when do you think is the best time to arrive ? When will we arrive ? Is a question that asks information about the future and means what time do we arrive at our destination. That's it so just to sum up you can use will or shall for the future with we or I but will is more common but when you make questions for offers, suggestions and advice with « we or I » then use shall. Thank you for watching more English grammar videos coming soon
Views: 22109 LetThemTalkTV
HOW TO BECOME FLUENT IN ENGLISH: 8 Things You Must Do
 
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If you follow these rules I promise you that you will succeed. I've taught English for more than 15 years. And I'm often asked the question "how do I get fluent in English?" So here are 8 best tips for achieving fluency., If you are struggling I hope this video will motivate you to continue. You can do it. Intermediate and advanced English lessons with subtitles on our youtube channel. Brought to you by LetThemTalk language school in Paris. We go deeper http://www.youtube.com/user/letthemtalkparis?sub_confirmation=1 Italian Afternoon by Twin Musicom is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Artist: http://www.twinmusicom.org/
Views: 1022900 LetThemTalkTV
English Can Save Your Life
 
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Welcome to LetThemTalkTV Improve your spoken English skills with LetThemTalkTV. Regular videos on English grammar, (British) pronunciation and vocabulary. Your host is Gideon from London. Our language school is in Paris and online. Subscribe to us here http://www.youtube.com/user/letthemtalkparis?sub_confirmation=1 Our website http://www.letthemtalk.fr In this video: The difference between "for" and "since"; The difference between the present perfect and the present perfect continuous; the difference in pronunciation between "bitch" and "beach" This video was made with http://open-ecommerce.org/ we highly recommend them for web design and video production
Views: 44885 LetThemTalkTV
21 Mistakes French Speakers Make in English - part 1
 
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Le top 21 erreurs d'anglais faites par les Francophones What are the most common mistakes that French speakers make when speaking English? Here is a list of the top 21. How many do you know? Watch part 2 here https://youtu.be/IKhDg2QVgVE Subscribe to LetThemTalkTV for more great learning English videos https://www.youtube.com/user/LetThemTalkParis TRANSCRIPT To agree is a verb so do say "I agree with you" and not I am agree with you.  A business that tries to make a profit is called a company not a society.  This word is pronounced idea with 3 syllables. an ID is your identity card.  Information has no plural. so informations is not correct instead say "some information" or count with "pieces for example" for example I've got 2 pieces of information. you take or sit and exam and if you are successful you pass it. The two types of food that you might eat are sweet and savoury. Salty means it contains a lot of salt.  A stranger is a person you don't know while a foreigner is a person from a different country to your own.  If you are sick you call a doctor. Medicine refers to the drugs the doctor will give you to make you better.  A bookshop is a place where you buy books while a library is a place where you borrow them.  It you are talking about dates say "it is the 5th November and not "we are the 5th November" In English email is the word for electronic correspondence and not "mail"  These word are pronounced psychology, psychiatry. I'll say it again psychology, psychiatry  Don't  say the planning when you mean a timetable or schedule. Don't confuse Tuesday and Thursday. To help you remember Tuesday sounds a little like 2 Tuesday, 2sday and it's the second day of the week An avocado is a fruit a person in the legal profession is a lawyer. If you say I spoke to an avocado yesterday then you are weird Don't say I took the  subway if you are in France In Paris you take the Metro, in New York the Subway and in London the underground or tube.  A dinner is you big meal of the day. A diner is a synonym for a restaurant or a customer at a restaurant.  A place where you pay little or no tax such as the Bahamas is called a tax haven not a tax heaven. Look at this picture. What do you call it in English. The correct word is a chateau (if it's in France or in the French style. ) don't confuse it with a castle is for military use and a palace is a royal place of residence such as the Palace of Versailles. and finally a student asked me "does  London miss you?"  well I don't know the answer to that question you'll have to ask London. You miss something or someone a more common question would be do you miss London? That's it. Thank you for watching more English language videos coming soon.
Views: 72190 LetThemTalkTV
WOULD as a past tense | Two Minute Grammar
 
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In this video we look at how to use WOULD for repetitive actions in the past. And compare it to WOULD as a conditional and USED TO Intermediate and advanced English lessons with subtitles on our youtube channel. Brought to you by LetThemTalk language school in Paris. We go deeper Subscribe here http://www.youtube.com/user/letthemtalkparis?sub_confirmation=1
Views: 19202 LetThemTalkTV
What's the difference between sick and ill?
 
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What's the difference between sick and ill ? In this video you'll find out. For more English language learning videos for vocabulary and grammar subscribe to LetThemTalkTV http://www.youtube.com/user/letthemtalkparis?sub_confirmation=1 Transcript. Hello and welcome to LetThemTalk OK first both words can be used to mean unwell. I felt sick/ill after the long journey. sick and not ill is used before a noun I have to look after my sick pet I'm taking sick leave from my job.  In British English sick can mean also mean vomit For example after the party he was sick on the pavement. Sick and not ill also has the meaning of fed up of . I'm sick of my job politicians make me sick. Some compound nouns use sick rather than ill such as seasick or homesick... in comparatives ill - sicker - sickest are used  for example yesterday I felt ill but today I feel even sicker. Iller is rarely used. However, in some phrases we use ill. Such as to be mentally ill. It's important to know about the origins of the two words in order to help understand the differences. "sick" is a saxon word which has always had the meaning unwell "ill" is a skandinavian word, it orginally just meant "bad" and it only started being used as a synonym for sick in the 19th century.  Its orignal meaning of bad it still used in many expressions.  Here are some examples ill mannered  ill fated  an ill-conceived idea. ill timed for example walking through the city late at night made me feel ill at ease.  There are many more so if you see ill followed by an adjective it usually means bad or badly and not sick. That's it! Thank you for watching more English language videos coming soon.
Views: 16742 LetThemTalkTV
5 English GRAMMAR points you are (probably) getting WRONG
 
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Are you making these 5 grammar mistakes in English? Take the test in our video and see how you do. I've been teaching English for 15 years and these are some of the most common English grammar mistakes I hear. So If you don't know what a compound adjective is, when to use SO and SUCH when to use COME and GO, when to use WHEN and WHENEVER amongst other things then stay tuned. This is part one of 2 grammar videos (10 common mistakes in total). Intermediate and advanced English lessons with subtitles on our youtube channel. Brought to you by LetThemTalk language school in Paris (and sometimes London) We go deeper Subscribe here http://www.youtube.com/user/letthemtalkparis?sub_confirmation=1
Views: 38967 LetThemTalkTV
What's the difference between "try to do" & "try doing"? English grammar
 
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in this English grammar video we will explain the difference between "try to do" and "try doing" (try + infinitive or try + verb + ing). Learn English with LetThemTalkTV. Subscribe here for more great English language videos http://www.youtube.com/user/letthemtalkparis?sub_confirmation=1 LetThemTalk is a language school based in Paris and online http://www.letthemtalk.fr TRANSCRIPT I've got some grammar for you today. We are going to look at the diffrence between try followed by and infinitive something and try +verb + ing When we use try to do it means we are going to make an effort So I've got a list of some thing I'm going to try to do this year. I will make an effort to do them. try to learn the guitar I tried to learn I'm going to improve my french I'm going to try to read more books. I'm going to try to go to the gym Sometimes both forms are possible with slightly different meanings. Look at these 2 similar sentences and try to see the difference I tried to improve my English by reading the newspaper every day My progress in English was slow so I tried reading the newspaper every day. So in the first example you and making an effort to improve your English. In the second example perhaps your previous efforts did not work very well so you are making an experiment to see if it helps solve the problem. you are trying to read the newspaper every day.
Views: 15302 LetThemTalkTV
5 Ways to INSTANTLY Sound Like a NATIVE SPEAKER (British English)
 
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Here are 5 tips (plus a bonus tip) to immediately sound more like a native speaker (of British English). This video is for ALL LEVELS. from low level to advanced. Even if your English is not fantastic with these ways you'll sound more natural and more native. These tips include focus on grammar, familiar language, slang, adding some advanced vocabulary, and touches on culture and the way British people would speak. Such as the use of understatement. We go deeper If you like our videos subscribe here for more. http://www.youtube.com/user/letthemtalkparis?sub_confirmation=1 Italian Afternoon by Twin Musicom is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Artist: http://www.twinmusicom.org/
Views: 144830 LetThemTalkTV
How to pronounce EITHER, NEITHER and words with ALTERNATIVE PRONUNCIATIONS
 
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In this video we'll discuss the pronunciations of either and neither and look at some other words that have alternative pronunciations in British English. such as garage, scone, privacy, envelope. How to pronounce often https://youtu.be/DCXcn3npv70 How to pronounce schedule https://youtu.be/gM0Ojnug7zU Intermediate and advanced English lessons with subtitles on our youtube channel. Brought to you by LetThemTalk language school in Paris. We go deeper If you like our videos subscribe here for more. http://www.youtube.com/user/letthemtalkparis?sub_confirmation=1
Views: 37869 LetThemTalkTV
Same but DIFFERENT: 15 ADVANCED and Intermediate ENGLISH Expressions COMPARED
 
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Sometimes the way that intermediate speakers express themselves and advanced speakers in English is different. In this video we look at 15 words and expressions that a native speaker would use but (probably) not an intermediate level learner of English. So if you wish to push up your level from intermediate to advanced this lesson will give you a nudge in that direction. Intermediate and advanced English lessons with subtitles on our youtube channel. Brought to you by LetThemTalk language school in Paris (and sometimes London). We go deeper Subscribe here http://www.youtube.com/user/letthemtalkparis?sub_confirmation=1
Views: 26396 LetThemTalkTV
How to pronounce often and -ften -sten words
 
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Do you pronounce the /t/ in often or is it silent? And what about other words with an "-sten" "-ften" combination of letters. British English pronunciation. Intermediate and advanced English lessons on our youtube channel. Brought to you by LetThemTalk language school in Paris. http://www.youtube.com/user/letthemtalkparis?sub_confirmation=1
Views: 42260 LetThemTalkTV
41 SUPER-DUPER Words for FLUENT English Conversation (Reduplication)
 
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Here we have 41 REDUPLICATIVE WORDS which are useful phrases that you can use in everyday conversation to increase your fluency. Native English speakers use reduplication a lot and if you want to reach an advanced level you should start using them too. Reduplicative words sound funny, they add a touch of playfullness to the language so do use them. Credits to this video Definitions from Macmillan Dictionary Merriam-Webster Dictionary Collins Dictionary Oxford English Dictionary Oxford Learner's Dictionary Dictionary.com Intermediate and advanced English lessons with subtitles on our youtube channel. Brought to you by LetThemTalk language school in Paris (and sometimes London). We go deeper Subscribe here http://www.youtube.com/user/letthemtalkparis?sub_confirmation=1 Learn English in Paris and online www.letthemtalk.fr
Views: 44634 LetThemTalkTV
Speak English Like a Native: Use though at the end of a sentence
 
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In this video you will learn how to use "though", "although" and "even though" and especially "though" at the end of a sentence which is common among native speakers in conversation and informal written English. Subscribe here for more great English language videos from LetThemTalkTV http://www.youtube.com/user/letthemtalkparis?sub_confirmation=1 TRANSCRIPT: Ahhh, breakfast time. This is Marmite. If you're familiar with British food you'll know that it tastes strange, very, very strange. It's good though. Hello and welcome to LetThemTalk What I want to show you today is how to use "though", "although" and "even "though" in English. But what I want you to especially pay attention to. Is how to use "though"   at the end of a sentence as it's very common among natives English speakers.  ok First of all lets look at the differences between "although" and "though". They are both used to show the contrast of an idea. As a conjunction, that is for connecting clauses in a sentence, they are exactly the same. Some say that "although" is more formal but you'll find both forms in written and spoken English.  You can use "though" or "although" at the beginning of a sentence: for example:  Though it was cold, we still went swimming or in the middle of a sentence for example I decided to go to the party, although I was tired. I passed the exam, although it was difficult Even though can also be used to show a greater contrast They gave him the job even though he was very young.  "though" (but not "although" or "even though") can also be used as an adverb at the end of a sentence. We do this a lot in conversation and informal writing.  we won the cup. It wasn't easy though So remember all you need is a statement, followed by an idea that shows a contrast to that statement then put "though" at the end. A lot of people like him. He's a complete idiot though.  to respond to what somebody else said with contrasting statement for example  This is a terrible film Yes, I know. I do like it though Using "though" like this at the end of a sentence like this is extremely common among native English speakers especially in conversation so do use it.   That's it thank you for watching, this English language video has finished we've got more coming soon though.
Views: 13344 LetThemTalkTV
Modal verbs MAY and MIGHT: EVERYTHING you need to know
 
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In this video will will look a the Modal verbs MAY and MIGHT (for the present and future). You can use MAY and MIGHT - to talk about possibility and probability but also to speculate about situations, to politely refuse and offer and to gentry criticize someone. We'll show you how with examples and practical tips so that you will get this grammar correct. Intermediate and advanced English lessons with subtitles on our youtube channel. Brought to you by LetThemTalk language school in Paris (and sometimes London). www.letthemtalk.fr We go deeper Subscribe here http://www.youtube.com/user/letthemtalkparis?sub_confirmation=1
Views: 21318 LetThemTalkTV
How to say schedule & the "ch" sound? Advanced British Pronunciation
 
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How to pronounce "schedule". The word "schedule" is pronounced differently in British and American English. Why is this? And how else is the "ch" sound pronounced in English. We explain. This is an English pronunciation video brought to you by LetThemTalkTV. We are a language school in Paris. For more information go to www.letthemtalk.fr Learn English with LetThemTalkTV. Subscribe here for more great English language videos http://www.youtube.com/user/letthemtalkparis?sub_confirmation=1 TRANSCRIPT =========== Etymology, the origin of words can be a useful guide to the right pronunciation in English take the "sch" combination of letters from Greek. Schoo Scheme, Scholar, Schizophrenic Schedule ? Yes, in British English it's pronounced schedule (/ˈʃɛˌdjuːl/). We'll return to the reason for that in a moment. So, the standard English pronunciation of the "ch" sound is /ˈtʃ/ such as in Child, butcher, chop, match if the word comes from French it's often pronounced in the French way with a "sh" (/ˈʃ/) sound Chef, chauffeur, ricochet, machine, brochure, parachute, moustache. if it's from Greek the sound is pronounced /ˈk/ - like a "k" sound. architect, echo, chaos, melancholy, chemical. orchestra. But "schedule" is a Greek work but is pronounced /ˈʃɛˌdjuːl/ in British English and /ˈskɛˌʤuːl/ in American English. In Britain it has been pronounced /ˈʃɛˌdjuːl/ for a long time and that's because it came into English via French. However, When Noel Webster was compiling his American dictionary of the English language 1843 edition he recognised the greek origins of the word and changed its pronunciation to /ˈskɛˌʤuːl/ So who's right the Brits or the Americans. Well, If you can't decide just say timetable.
Views: 15994 LetThemTalkTV
For, ago, since and during - the difference -. English grammar lesson
 
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In this video lesson we explain the difference between for, since, ago and during with examples of usage. Intermediate and advanced English lessons on our youtube channel. Brought to you by LetThemTalk language school in Paris. http://www.youtube.com/user/letthemtalkparis?sub_confirmation=1 This is an English language video brought to you by LetThemTalkTV. We are a language school in Paris. For more information go to www.letthemtalk.fr TRANSCRIPT =========== Hello and welcome to LetThemTalk, my name is Gideon and I'm an English teacher in Paris. I thought I'd record a quick video about one of the most common grammar questions I get. It's about the difference between "for", "since", "ago" and "during". Let's get straight into it. We use "for" to talk about a period of time. The focus here is on the length of time and not when it happened so the phrase can be in the past in the future or in the present. Here are some examples I lived in Switzerland for 3 years. I've been thinking about changing my job for a long time. I want to stay here for a week. I'll be available for 2 hours "Since" is used to talk about the starting point of an action and it includes the time from the starting point until now. And because we are looking at the past and the present the "since" is usually used with a perfect tense. We can use it with a date or time but not necessarily it can be used with any phrase that indicates when something started. Let's look at some examples I've been working since 8am We haven't seen each other since 2012 He moved next door last week and since then we've been trying to find out more about him. I've lived in this house since I was born With "ago" we talk about when something in happened in the past because of this we use it with a past tense. A long time ago I realized my future lay elsewhere. he arrived six months ago. she left a few minutes ago. I'm still recovering from the party we had 2 days ago. We use "during" when we want to say what happened inside a particular period of time. We are referring to when something happens but this can be in the present, future or the past. Here are some examples. During the meeting I drank 5 cups of coffee During my skiing trip I broke my leg. How about we visit a museum during your stay? I'll pick up the package during my break. Don't confuse "During" and "for": Look at these 2 sentences. I went to Italy for the summer I went to Italy during the summer. We use "for" to refer to the whole of a period use for. So the first sentence I went to Italy for the summer means that I was there all the summer. To say when something happened but not its duration use "during". So I went to Italy during the summer might mean that you were there for a day, a week, a month. We don't know.
Views: 11965 LetThemTalkTV
How to understand native English speakers (word linking)
 
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Even if you speak English very well, sometimes it's difficult to understand native speakers. Why is that? It's not because we speak too fast. In this video we look at "Word linking". Understanding this will help your fluency and comprehension. #pronunciation #englishpronunciation #wordlinking #connected speech This is an English grammar video brought to you by LetThemTalkTV. We are a language school in Paris. For more information go to www.letthemtalk.fr Learn English with LetThemTalkTV. Subscribe here for more great English language videos http://www.youtube.com/user/letthemtalkparis?sub_confirmation=1 TRANSCRIPT =========== Good morning room service Pierre speaking Ah Pierre, This is Mr Johnson in room 4999 We are having a little party here can you bring us some more ice? Rice ok, which rice boiled, fried. Not rice we want some ice Mice, you want mice Mice with rice what are you saying No, you fool. ice, ice cube for our drinks Oh, Ice ok I got it. Some ice not some mice. I am souris for the mice. The ice is for the champagne for my friend. I've drunk a lot of champagne now I want to drink beer a bit. So bring me up a bottle. What? you want a rabbit with beer. What are you talking about "rabbit" no I just want some beer. But I though you said beer rabbit. Ok une biere sans lapin. anything else. Yes, I m getting hungry do you have any yeggs. What is a yegg ? I am not familiar with this. it is an English food? Eggs dear boy.. just Make us an omelette. Egg, omelette ok, I;ll prepare everything, monseuir. Oh and when you come bring us four candles. Fork handles? don't you want to use all the fork? Candles for the atmosphere four of them. These English they really need to pronounce their language correctly. In English we use word linking to join words together in order to speak more fluently and more naturally. There are 3 patterns of word linking. Vowel to vowel, consonant to vowel and consonant to consonant. English native speakers don't like to put too many vowel sounds together. We find it hard to pronounce but, of course it happens frequently. So what do we do? When we have 2 vowels sounds next to each other we will often add the sound of a consonant in between to make it easier to pronounce. It's like a phantom letter because it's spoken but not written. Let me give an example. Two of us....Two of us....In this phrase you have an u (ooo) followed by another vowel an o (o, hop). It's difficult for us to say it so in here we will add a "w" sound in between. Two of us. Two of us. Now "of" and "us" have weak forms "ev" and "us". So you'll often hear "two of us" pronounced "te we vus", "two we vus". We'll discuss weak forms in another video but as you can see what you see and what you hear are quite different. Adding an extra sound is called intrusion. You can have an intrusive "r" an intrusive "w" and an intrusive "y". In Standard British English the "r" sound at the end of words is not pronounced. For example. "Far", "door", "beer". But when words ending with an "r" precede a word that begins with a vowel An /r/ sound is inserted. For example. "Far and wide", "the door inside", "beer or wine". After these vowel sounds you'll have an intrusive "r" /ə/ , /ɑː/ (car), or /ɔː/ door/saw . Let's look at some more examples. An idea of mine... /ə/ I saw a man with a dog Where are the cookies You might hear this "r" sound within a word with 2 vowels together. For example draw but "drawing" which is easier to pronounce than drawing. terror but terrorist. The intrusive "W" you'll hear after an "ooo", an "o (go) and an "ow" sound. Who are you? Go upstairs Now and then And you'll find it in with individual words. Do but doing. cow but coward The Intrusive /j/ you'll hear after these sounds /i:/(bee) /aɪ/(I) /ei/ (they) - intrusive y The city is far away. We y are not alone I can see y over the wall I y am what I y am. They y understand . for the intrusive sounds, do remember that you are not obliged to use them . Even native speakers might not use them all the time. However, you should learn them as knowing them will certainly improve your understanding. When a word ends in a consonant and the next word begins with a vowel sound we sometimes push the consonant to the beginning of the next word. I had a ba dapple. Ge tup Nigh tand day. I nee dit. Ice or water or is it I saw water? It sounds the same. When you have a word ending in a consonant and the next word begins with the same or a similar consonant you only need to say it once. a bad day. just say the "d" one time. So not a bad day but a baday. a big girl one night. Ice scream. Or is it Ice cream. So there you are, by learning word linking you'll certainly improve your comprehension and you'll speak more fluently. That's the yend Now go away and have a gooday.
Views: 31744 LetThemTalkTV
HOWEVER, WHILE, DESPITE, ALTHOUGH, ALBEIT, NEVERTHELESS....Words to show a contrast
 
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In this video we look at words to express a contrast in a sentence. Such as however, nevertheless, although, though, while, whereas, despite, in spite of and Albeit. You will need these to express your argument clearly both in spoken and written English. Intermediate and advanced English lessons with subtitles on our youtube channel. Brought to you by LetThemTalk language school in Paris. We go deeper Subscribe here http://www.youtube.com/user/letthemtalkparis?sub_confirmation=1
Views: 58920 LetThemTalkTV
PAST MODALS: Might've, Could've, Should've, Would've, Must've....
 
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In this video you will learn all the grammar about past modals MIGHT'VE, COULD'VE, WOULD'VE, MUST'VE, SHOULD'VE, MAY HAVE. We'll look at how to use them in different situations such as speculating about the past, talking about certainty, obligation, past conditionals past recommendations and criticism of past actions. After this video you'll know this grammar perfectly! Use of MAY and MIGHT in the present https://youtu.be/r7brXdy15Lc Informal contractions: WOULDA, COULDA, SHOULDA, .... https://youtu.be/Wf_UFZeTIMw Intermediate and advanced English lessons with subtitles on our youtube channel. Brought to you by LetThemTalk language school in Paris (and sometimes London) We go deeper Subscribe here http://www.youtube.com/user/letthemtalkparis?sub_confirmation=1
Views: 44173 LetThemTalkTV
How to INSTANTLY sound like a NATIVE SPEAKER and be more PERSUASIVE with MILD SWEARING
 
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Here's a little psychological trick to sound more persuasive Use "mild swearing": It has been proven by a study by the University of Illinois that when you use it you will sound more persuasive and more convincing to your listeners. So whether it be in your private or professional life this psychology will help you win the argument. Intermediate and advanced English lessons with subtitles on our youtube channel. Brought to you by LetThemTalk language school in Paris (and sometimes London) We go deeper Subscribe here http://www.youtube.com/user/letthemtalkparis?sub_confirmation=1
Views: 17941 LetThemTalkTV
ON TIME or IN TIME: Learn the difference
 
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How to know when to use ON TIME and when to use IN TIME? In this video we explore the differences. Just changing a preposition can give the phrase another meaning but after wathcing this you'll understand everything. An English language video with subtitles. This is an English grammar video brought to you by LetThemTalkTV. We go deeper If you like our videos subscribe here for more. http://www.youtube.com/user/letthemtalkparis?sub_confirmation=1 TRANSCRIPT =========== Hello and welcome to LetThemTalk and this is Just a quick video to explain the difference between IN TIME and ON TIME. They look similar but there is a slight difference in meaning so I thought I'd explain that today. OK So ON TIME just means NOT LATE - not late, that's all it means. We arrived on time for our flight we were not late for our flight He's always on time - it means he's a punctual person. not late You should hand in your homework ON TIME - ok so not after the deadline - not late I won't be at the meeting ON TIME - ok so that means I'll be late for the meeting. So what about IN TIME. We use IN TIME to talk about before the time or with sufficient time. Sufficient time before something happens. so For example, . We have to take the train and if we arrive IN TIME we'll get a cup of coffee I left work late but I arrived IN TIME to see my children before they went to bed or so with sufficient time. Ok and you can use IN TIME (and not "on time") to talk about something without a fixed appointment or schedule or timetable. so for example, I managed to reach Jim IN TIME, before he left. So there is no schedule when Jim is leaving. He just leaves when he leaves. So we got there before so I say I reached him IN TIME We got him to the hospital IN TIME. We didn't have a hospital appointment we urgently needed to get there so we got to the appointment IN TIME We missed lunch but we arrived IN TIME for dinner. We arrived in time for dinner there is no scheduled appointment or starting time for dinner but got there in time or with sufficient time. Ok that's it I hope that's clear now. thank you for watching more English language videos coming soon.
Views: 11415 LetThemTalkTV
What's the difference between will and going to?
 
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In this video you will learn the difference between "will" and "going to" for the future and for making predictions. Subscribe to LetThemTalkTV for more great learning English videos http://www.youtube.com/user/letthemtalkparis?sub_confirmation=1 Transcript: Hello and welcome to LetThemTalk My name is Gideon and today we are going to look at the difference between will and going to for the future. Let's have a look. : First of all for the simple future « will « is used when we talk about decisions, intentions, opinions. that you make at the moment of speaking. So you don't use it for situations where you decided before the time of speaking. The structure is will + infinitive without to Sometimes, words like think or maybe proceed will. Here are some examples. Oh no there's no coffee, Ok maybe I'll have some tea. I'm bored I know I'll watch TV I think I'll grow a beard You use will for promises You also use will to give and ask for information about the future for example. We'll be there at 7pm Will you be at the meeting ? The election will take place in November. It will get dark tonight at 7pm Going to is used to talk about plans, decisions and arrangements you made before speaking. The structure is going to + verb...in conversation going to is often pronounced as gonna » For example.... I'm going to learn Japanese. See you later I'm going to post a letter. I'm going to live in Australia.... When I have enough money I'm going to buy a car. Will and Going to can both be used to make predictions but in slightly different ways Will is used when we are predicting something based on our opinion while going to is used to talk about predictions based on present evidence. Before the game you might say I think England will win the game. There are 10 minutes left and Germany are winning 3 – 0 so you would say. Ok can't deny it Germany are going to win. You can say I think it'll rain tomorrow. But if your see many clouds in the sky then there is evidence so you could say.. It looks like it's going to rain. So if there is evidence for a prediction use going to here are some more examples She's going to have a baby He's going to win. If you drink and drive you're going to crash If you eat like that you're going to get fat. Will a prediction based on your opinion. I think she'll find it difficult. It will be difficult to convince them. She'll fine another guy soon. That's it thank you for watching more English language videos coming soon.
Views: 6280 LetThemTalkTV
What's the difference between LAY and LIE?  | Two Minute Grammar
 
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Watch this video to know (in about 2 minutes) the difference between TO LAY and TO LIE (there are 2 verbs TO LIE in fact). These words that are often confused even by native English speakers. Improve your English grammar with this short videos series. Intermediate and advanced English lessons with subtitles on our youtube channel. Brought to you by the LetThemTalk language school in Paris (and sometimes in London). www.letthemtalk.fr We go deeper
Views: 9066 LetThemTalkTV
WEAK FORMS IN ENGLISH
 
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If you want to understand English better and sound more natural and more like a native speaker you need to understand weak forms in English. This video looks at weak forms using British pronunciation including the most important sound - the schwa. There are many weak forms in English and we couldn't discuss them all in one short video so have a look at this link to learn about all the weak forms in English http://www.perfect-english-grammar.com/support-files/weak-forms-list.pdf Intermediate and advanced English lessons on our youtube channel. Brought to you by LetThemTalk language school in Paris. http://www.youtube.com/user/letthemtalkparis?sub_confirmation=1 This is an English language video brought to you by LetThemTalkTV. We are a language school in Paris. For more information go to www.letthemtalk.fr TRANSCRIPT =========== I'm going to say this sentence 6 times Listen and repeat. Are you ready? TODAY is the best day of my life. - today not yesterday Today IS the best day of my life - it is not isn't Today is the BEST day of my life - the best not the worst Today is the best DAY of my life. - the best day but not the best month Today is the best day of MY life - my life not yours Today is the best day of my LIFE Here's my question. In those sentences how did you pronounce "of". Listen again. Did you get it right? If you said /ev/ then congratulations So if we don't stress OF most English speakers will pronounce it /əv/ in everyday speech. That's right /əv/ Of course, sometimes we say OF perhaps if it appears at the end of a sentence. For example. What are you thinking of? But most of the time it's unstressed so we use the weak form /ev/ that's the schwa sound pronounced /e/ followed by a /v/ sound. So try the sentence again "Today is the best day of my life?" In English there are a few common words that have strong and weak forms. OF is one of them. OF is the strong form /əv/ is the weak form. Do you know any more? You probably do. "And" has a weak form /ən/. Night n Day, Rock n roll. Who says rock and roll? Nobody. So some very common short words such as, FOR, TO, A and many auxiliary verbs have weak forms. . Knowing them will help your speaking and your listening. You need to be able to recognize weak forms in a sentence if you want to understand native English speakers. And if you want to sound fluent when speaking you need to know them too. I'll leave a link in the description with a list of all the weak forms. They are important so do learn them. here is just one more example. FROM. That's the strong form but in most situations English speakers don't say that instead they'll stay the weak form FRM Like most weak forms it has a schwa sound /e/. for example He comes from far away. If FROM is at the end of the sentence you would use the strong form because you are stressing it. Where are you from. But did you notice that in that sentence altough FROM was stressed but we used the weak form of ARE which is /e/ Where are you from? OK that's it I'm gonna have a cup of tea and read a book now. So it's goodbye from me. .And see you next time.
Views: 21968 LetThemTalkTV
ZERO, FIRST AND SECOND CONDITIONALS a Pig & the Worst Ukulele Player in the World
 
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In this video we look at how to use the zero, first and second conditionals in English. The explanation is helped by a little British pig. We look at how to use each conditional. We explain how to form them and give an example for each conditional. An explanation of the third conditional will be in an upcoming video. This video will help you improve your English grammar. There is a homage to The Clash "Should I stay or should I go?" in this video. Intermediate and advanced English lessons with subtitles on our youtube channel. Brought to you by LetThemTalk language school in Paris (and sometimes London). We go deeper Subscribe here http://www.youtube.com/user/letthemtalkparis?sub_confirmation=1
Views: 7322 LetThemTalkTV
The top 10 mispronounced words in English made by foreign learners
 
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We went onto the streets of London to ask foreign learners of English hand native speakers how to pronounce some difficult words. The results were sometimes funny, sometimes surprising. This is our top 10. Original list of common English pronunciation mistakes compiled during 15 years of English teaching (EFL/ESL). If so have suggestions for other words let please let us know Watch part 2: 10 more mispronounced words in English here https://youtu.be/QG6uKh56qWc For more English language learning videos subscribe to LetThemTalkTV http://www.youtube.com/user/letthemtalkparis?sub_confirmation=1 Check out our other video French Expressions in English 10 you need to know. Also recorded on the streets of London. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bBINHn9tblc Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/GBA_LetThemTalk More information about LetThemTalk's innovative aprroach to language learning and about our school in Paris see our website. http://www.letthemtalk.fr
Views: 1338798 LetThemTalkTV
Common but strange British English Expressions: BOB'S YOUR UNCLE
 
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Here is a rather strange everyday idiom: Bob's your uncle. We explain its origin and give examples of how it's used. It really is common and you'll hear it frequently so next time you're speaking to an English speaking person or visiting Britain do use it. Intermediate and advanced English lessons on our youtube channel. Brought to you by LetThemTalk language school in Paris. http://www.youtube.com/user/letthemtalkparis?sub_confirmation=1 TRANSCRIPT =========== Great Britain 1887 the Prime Minister is Robert "Bob" Cecil. There is a vacancy in his government for a Chief Secretary for Ireland, After some consideration the Prime Minister announces his choice "The new Chief secretary for Ireland is Alfred Balfour. What, who? People exclaimed. This is a very important post and yet he's chosen somebody unknown for the post. Wait a minute isn't Alfred Balfour The Prime Minister's nephew? Ah now I understand, You are a nobody but Bob's your uncle and you've got the job. Today, Bob's you uncle is a very common and useful British English expression. It means something like "it's easy", "there you are", the French might translate it as "et voila". Let's look at some example. You enter the code you click on the button and "Bob's your uncle" it works The cake is easy to make you mix some flour, eggs, sugar and butter you put it in the oven and in half an hour Bob's your uncle it's done. It's not complicated you just add hot water and bob's your uncle it's ready.
Views: 18771 LetThemTalkTV
Speak English like a native: How to use gonna, wanna, gotta, oughta
 
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In this video you'll learn how to use gonna, wanna, gotta and oughta. When to use them and when not to use them in both formal and informal English. Subscribe here for more great English language videos from LetThemTalkTV http://www.youtube.com/user/letthemtalkparis?sub_confirmation=1 LetThemTalk is a language school based in Paris and online http://www.letthemtalk.fr
Views: 17913 LetThemTalkTV
How to Pass an INTERVIEW with Little or NO EXPERIENCE
 
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Learn how to prepare for an interview when you have little or NO experience It's always difficult to know how to approach an interview if you are a recent graduate or you have some qualifications but no, or not much experience. In this video we'll show you what to do. We've got some general tips and if English is not your first language then we have some advice as to how to answer to make the most of your English level (even if it's not fantastic). Your host is Gideon CEO of LetThemTalk in Paris and formerly an IT consultant in London. Intermediate and advanced English lessons with subtitles on our youtube channel. Brought to you by LetThemTalk language school in Paris. We go deeper Subscribe here http://www.youtube.com/user/letthemtalkparis?sub_confirmation=1
Views: 23584 LetThemTalkTV
The Top 10 French expressions in English - But do we still use them?
 
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10 French expressions in English you must know, what they mean, how to use them and how to pronounce (and how not to mis-pronounce) them. But do English speakers still use them? We went on to the streets of London to find out. There are lots of French words and expressions in English such as bon voyage and coup d'état but are they still used by English speaking people. LetThemTalk went to find out. The results are funny and surprising. Here are 10 French expressions used in English that you should know. Subrscribe to get more free online English video lesson. LetThemTalk is a language school based in Paris. For more information go to http://www.letthemtalk.fr
Views: 16588 LetThemTalkTV
5 GRAMMAR MISTAKES  you didn't know you were making
 
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Here are 5 extremely common grammar mistakes than English learners make. Be careful if you are translating from your own language because sometimes we say things very differently in English. So you'll learn the difference between "swimming" and "go swimming", when NOT to use YES and NO in English. How to respond to SHALL WE questions and much more. There are 5 grammar challenges in all. How many do you know. This video was recorded partly in London in Mount Street Gardens, Mayfair and on Upper Regent Street. 5 English grammar points you are probably getting wrong https://youtu.be/fT6n-NvYvb8 The difference between WILL and SHALL https://youtu.be/w-AxrMgNiSg Intermediate and advanced English lessons with subtitles on our youtube channel. Brought to you by LetThemTalk language school in Paris (and sometimes London) We go deeper Subscribe here http://www.youtube.com/user/letthemtalkparis?sub_confirmation=1
Views: 76704 LetThemTalkTV
6 English Language HACKS that you DIDN'T LEARN at school
 
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The way that native English speakers communicate and the way you learn English at school is often quite different. In this lesson (based on 15 years of teaching English) We look at the gaps between people who have a good level of English learnt through the education system and native English speakers. We believe you will be surprised by wome of the points raised here and you might even utter the phrase "wow I never knew that!" This lesson is for ESL / EFL students of all levels. Among the topics included here: Use of THOUGH at the end of a sentence, use of suffix -ISH, I'm afraid vs I'm sorry, Like vs such as' speaking impersonally about people using THERE ARE. VIDEO LINKS Using -ISH https://youtu.be/t3TSN4bBf3Q Although - though and even though https://youtu.be/lg8V8tZLVIQ I'm afraid vs I'm sorry https://youtu.be/3tdmDV3oSic Intermediate and advanced English lessons with subtitles on our youtube channel. Brought to you by LetThemTalk language school in Paris. We go deeper Subscribe here http://www.youtube.com/user/letthemtalkparis?sub_confirmation=1
Views: 184808 LetThemTalkTV
HOW TO USE THE PAST PERFECT TENSE
 
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In this video we explain how to use the PAST PERFECT in English. We'll look at how it is formed, some examples, some tricks on when to use it. We'll also look at some common mistakes with the past perfect tense especially compared to the past simple. Finally, we'll look at some advanced used of the Past perfect. This video will help you improve your English grammar. Intermediate and advanced English lessons with subtitles on our youtube channel. Brought to you by LetThemTalk language school in Paris (and sometimes London). We go deeper Subscribe here http://www.youtube.com/user/letthemtalkparis?sub_confirmation=1
Views: 14701 LetThemTalkTV
Have you got a problem with your English? What you need to know
 
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Do you sometimes say to yourself. "I've got a problem with my English" In this video we look at why we say this and how to overcome negative thoughts about learning English and studying in general Intermediate and advanced English lessons with subtitles on our youtube channel. Brought to you by LetThemTalk language school in Paris (and sometimes London) We go deeper Subscribe here http://www.youtube.com/user/letthemtalkparis?sub_confirmation=1
Views: 20960 LetThemTalkTV
10 More Commonly Mispronounced Words in English by Foreign Learners
 
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In this video you'll learn how to pronounce 10 commonly mispronounced words in English. Take the test and see how you did at the end. This is a follow up to "The top 10 mispronounced words in English made by foreign learners" which you can see here. https://youtu.be/GZTJXtcOkvU This time we recorded on the streets of with our students from LetThemTalk language school and we asked them how to pronounce some difficult words. The results were sometimes quite funny. The native speakers are British but American pronunciation would be similar for these words (phonetically). Recorded in the second arrondissement in Paris Subscribe here for more great English language videos from LetThemTalkTV http://www.youtube.com/user/letthemtalkparis?sub_confirmation=1 LetThemTalk is a language school based in Paris and online http://www.letthemtalk.fr
Views: 61160 LetThemTalkTV
How to Use the Present Perfect Continuous
 
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In this video we look at the present perfect continuous tense in English (also called the present perfect progressive) we'll look at how you use it, in which situations and compare it to the present perfect and the present continuous. After this video you'll know it perfectly We also have made a video about the past perfect here https://youtu.be/8dYeBKL9TtY And the difference between the present perfect and past simple https://youtu.be/PMPP_-q9ZuI Intermediate and advanced English lessons with subtitles on our youtube channel. Brought to you by LetThemTalk language school in Paris (and sometimes London) We go deeper Subscribe here http://www.youtube.com/user/letthemtalkparis?sub_confirmation=1
Views: 17647 LetThemTalkTV
REALLY USEFUL Phrasal Verbs with BE
 
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Here are some really useful phrasal verbs (and idioms and adjectives) with the verb TO BE. Phrasal verbs are often confusing and this is especially true of those with the verb TO BE. It's important that you understand them and, with some practice you can use them too. This video was recorded in on the streets of London. Especially the West End. I hope you enjoy it. You might also like our video 101 really useful Phrasal Verbs https://youtu.be/UCEYZnIszxM Intermediate and advanced English lessons with subtitles on our youtube channel. Brought to you by LetThemTalk language school in Paris (and sometimes London). We go deeper Subscribe here http://www.youtube.com/user/letthemtalkparis?sub_confirmation=1
Views: 20100 LetThemTalkTV

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